randomhouse:

ebookfriendly:

Summer reading / by Doug Salati

Happy August, dudes.

randomhouse:

ebookfriendly:

Summer reading / by Doug Salati

Happy August, dudes.



I would like to say in my defense that I don’t really get the appeal of YOLO. I live many times over. Hypothetical, subterranean lives that run beneath the relative tedium of my own and have the power to occasionally penetrate or even derail it. I find it hard to name the one book that was so damn delightful it changed my life. The truth is, they have all changed my life, every single one of them—even the ones I hated. Books are my version of ‘experiences.’ I’m made of them.
Zadie Smith, “What It Means to Be Addicted to Reading”

(Source: oprah.com)



Five of the South's Great Independent Bookstores



Bring Reading Rainbow Back for Every Child, Everywhere.

Take a look, it’s in a book — or, on the internet. Reading Rainbow returns! 



It’s not like we stop needing the comfort and help that a good story can bring when we graduate from high school. I am still looking for answers to questions about the meaning of life. I am still trying to fathom the wondrous strangeness of love. I am still trying to make my way through life despite heartache and loss. So yes, when I set out to write a novel about two young people living with cancer who fall in love with a book and then with each other, I was writing it for teenagers. But I was also writing it for my adult self — the one who wanted to know whether love really is stronger than death and who wanted to find hope and joy and humor amid hard times. Those desires know no age.
John Green, “Are You Too Old for Young Adult Fiction?” in Cosmopolitan 

(Source: cosmopolitan.com)



I want one!

I want one!

(Source: peaceofmind98)



For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet or excite you. Books help us understand who we are and how we are to behave. They show us what community and friendship mean; they show us how to live and die.
Anne Lamott, Bird By Bird (via bookmania)


Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.
G.K. Chesterton 


bookmania:

Library loft at Fonthill, a historic Arts and Crafts mansion in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. More amazing library photos by Karl Graf here.

I want to go to there. 

bookmania:

Library loft at Fonthill, a historic Arts and Crafts mansion in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. More amazing library photos by Karl Graf here.

I want to go to there. 



37 Books For Kids You Need To Re-Read As An Adult

Harry Potter

Because it’s even more magical than you remember.

The Phantom Tollbooth

Because it’s like Lewis Carroll without all the jabberwocky and drug references and begs to be adapted into a live action-film. When that happens, you’ll want the book to be fresh in your mind.

The BFG

Because Roald Dahl is a gift to humanity and I’ve always felt the BFG gets overshadowed by his other works, despite being a clear influence on J.K. Rowling. Without Dahl’s Chickens, there would be no Sorcerer’s Stone.

Tuck Everlasting

Because if you want to read a story about a young girl attracted to an immortal, you can do a lot better than Twilight. Natalie Babbitt got there first — and better.

Nancy Drew

Because that girl was a total badass. Sorry, Hardy Boys, but there can only be one.

Where the Sidewalk Ends

Because Shel Silverstein has an endless font of beautiful things to say, proof that you’re never too old or too young for poetry.

Ramona Quimby, Age 8

Because no matter what age you are, you are Ramona forever.