Hailing from the same era of television that made Joss Whedon and Aaron Sorkin into icons, ‘Gilmore Girls’ featured many of the same qualities that made ‘Buffy’ and ‘West Wing’ so beloved — great actors, quality production values and dialogue so distinctive that you could pick it out of a line-up, blindfolded. And that came directly from series showrunner Amy Sherman-Palladino (who created the show with her husband Dan).

While not necessarily everyone’s taste, the speed-talking and pop culture references made sure that ‘Gilmore Girls’ sounded like nothing else on television, and proved Sherman-Palladino’s importance to the show when, after her departure at the end of Season 6, the series struggled to recapture her voice. When discussing the history of auteur television, Sherman-Palladino’s name frankly does not come up enough, and that’s a shame.



What good is the internet if we can’t use it to find some sound advice from others every once in a while? 

Some of the best advice posts I’ve seen lately:

Anna Akana: Things Every Girl Should Know (video above)

Stop putting down other girls. Stop hating other girls. Stop feeling threatened and insecure and jealous because that’s just getting in the way of you knowing a really awesome human being. You know, no one can ever be you. No one is you. So there’s really no sense in feeling any kind of competition. 

Is it possible to make this required viewing for all high school students? If so, someone send the Powers That Be the link to Anna’s video.  

Akilah Hughes: 24 Things I Learned at 24

You Don’t Have to Do It Perfectly, You Just Have to Do It. I will likely say this in multiple points, but life is made in the doing. The people who you think are super successful probably aren’t the best at what they do, they just had the courage to show up and do the damn thing. You owe it to yourself to do. the. damn. thing.

I’m 28 and so much of what Akilah writes here hits home. If you’re not following her on TumblrTwitter or YouTube, get on that. 

Anne T. Donahue: Here’s everything I wish I knew on my first day of high school

It’s the first day of school for some of you! This is exciting because Jesus Christ: HIGH SCHOOL. So daunting. Intimidating. Really, really big. But also: conquerable. Or at the very least: survivable. You will survive high school. 

This is something I really wish I’d known when I was 14. I actually really wish I’d known a lot of things because I think I would’ve had an easier time and gotten along with everyone better or at least not cared if everyone didn’t get along with me. 

With my 10-year high school reunion fast approaching, this post was very poignant for me. Read and take notes, folks. 

How to Adult: Everything they post, really. 

Need to know how to fix a flat tire? File your taxes? Do laundry? Mike and Emma have got you covered. Follow on YouTube and Tumblr and feel better about being an adult, because we all know how absurd it can be. 



When Auggie spoke for all the people who grew up watching “Boy Meets World.”

(Source: jakeparalta)



epicreads:

Quotes about nature from YA books via Epic Reads



The dangerous world of freelance journalism

From the opinion section of the L.A. Times:

"I often wonder if what I’m doing is worth the risk and the stress it causes my family. But then I imagine what it would be like if there were no journalists reporting on, say, Ebola — no trusted news sources explaining the reach of the disease and its effects on communities. Lack of information can lead to paranoia, anger and, ultimately, in the case of a disease such as Ebola, to a worse epidemic."



I’m going to tell you something important. Grown-ups don’t look like grown-ups on the inside either. Outside, they’re big and thoughtless and they always know what they’re doing. Inside, they look just like they always have. Like they did when they were your age. The truth is, there aren’t any grown-ups. Not one, in the whole wide world.
The Ocean at the End of the Lane, by Neil Gaiman (via brutereason)


smartgirlsattheparty:

Submitted via our Facebook Page: “Here is Riley, age 10 doing science experiments on a Sunday morning while listening to the Top Gun soundtrack on vinyl and watching 30 Rock re-runs. She didn’t learn to read until 2nd grade but now is one grade level above her age peers! She wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up and she has joined the math team and Volleyball team at school this year!”
According to Smart Girl Riley’s mom “On the second day of school this year she had a substitute named Ms. Lemon who gave the class a spelling test and she told her ‘Good God, Lemon’” :)
Riley is changing the world by being herself and proving that Smart Girls Have More Fun!

GOOD GOD, LEMON. 

smartgirlsattheparty:

Submitted via our Facebook Page: “Here is Riley, age 10 doing science experiments on a Sunday morning while listening to the Top Gun soundtrack on vinyl and watching 30 Rock re-runs. She didn’t learn to read until 2nd grade but now is one grade level above her age peers! She wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up and she has joined the math team and Volleyball team at school this year!”

According to Smart Girl Riley’s mom “On the second day of school this year she had a substitute named Ms. Lemon who gave the class a spelling test and she told her ‘Good God, Lemon’” :)

Riley is changing the world by being herself and proving that Smart Girls Have More Fun!

GOOD GOD, LEMON. 



Postmodern Jukebox, Stay With Me - Vintage 1940s “Old Hollywood” Style Sam Smith Cover ft. Cristina Gatti



Nashville's Music Row: Should ugly buildings be preserved? | Al Jazeera America

From Al Jazeera America: 

For any city, boom-time conditions are followed by inevitable growing pains. But veterans of Nashville’s commercial recording industry complain that a city that has branded itself over the last 50-plus years as “Music City” is in danger of turning into a landscape of luxury apartments, mixed-use retail and other amenities.

“We’re up against a lot of money being dangled in front of folks, and the American way is to say ‘It’s yours, you won it, and you should get the most you can,’” says Sharon Corbitt-House, co-manager of singer-songwriter Ben Folds. “But there has to be a balance. We’re Music City, and not Condo City.”

However, the outcry over 30 Music Square West, where RCA Studio A is located, has led to a broader discussion about property rights versus cultural heritage. Over time, one central question has emerged: How can cities preserve sites of cultural importance when the buildings where history was made are mid-century industrial spaces or converted frame homes and bungalows, and in some cases are not very old?

“These are pretty ordinary, cheap, architecturally indistinct and disposable structures that nonetheless are consecrated because they produced standards that are part of the American popular canon,” says Richard Lloyd, a sociologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. “That is one of the challenges of preservation in Nashville. A lot of the musical distinction happened in indistinct architecture.”



One glance at a book and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for 1,000 years. To read is to voyage through time.
Carl Sagan (via daringyetdarling)